Press Coverage

NEFAC receives considerable press coverage each year for its consistent advocacy of freedom of information and First Amendment concerns. Below are links to stories we’ve appeared in during the current year. Coverage from previous years can be seen here:

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What Types of Force Can KPD Use? City Won’t Say | The Keene Sentinel 3.21.20

It’s hard for the public to assess such claims when key parts of the relevant policy are kept hidden, said Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, a transparency advocacy group. “It’s really difficult to know if police are acting reasonably when it comes to the use of force if we don’t know what their policies are,” he said.

T&G Still Pursuing Police IAD Records in Court | Telegram & Gazette 3.20.20

“You know there’s an issue when the Massachusetts State Police is being more transparent than you,” said Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition. Silverman, whose organization defends and promotes public access to government, said internal affairs reports are crucial to the public’s understanding of whether officers who commit misconduct are being held accountable. “It’s all about the trust that we as citizens can have of our law enforcement, and without knowing of allegations of misconduct and how departments are responding, it’s very difficult to maintain that trust,” Silverman said. Silverman said departments withholding information is common – a dynamic that leaves people wondering about whether they are adequately policing themselves. If an officer committed misconduct, the public deserves to know, Silverman said, and if they did not, it would only seem beneficial to everyone to let the public know the conclusion was reached after a thorough process.

Transparency in Government is Essential During the Coronavirus (Op/Ed) | The Boston Globe 3.20.20

Timely and accurate information about government is crucial to maintaining trust during a crisis. We can’t trust our public institutions unless we know what they’re doing on our behalf. When authorities provide guidance on how to flatten the curve, for example, we need to know the facts supporting their remarks. When difficult decisions are made about medical care or restricting civil liberties, we need to know how and why these decisions were made. Only through that transparency can we trust that government is responding appropriately.

Keeping the Light On – During Sunshine Week and Always (Op/Ed) | Concord Monitor 3.18.20

Whether through whistleblowers like Kois or the use of state and federal freedom of information laws, knowing about our government is crucial to maintaining trust in public institutions. This trust is essential to our democracy and increasingly, given the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, our safety. When government authorities provide guidance on how to slow the spread of the virus, for example, we need to know the facts and data supporting their remarks. When difficult decisions are made regarding medical care or the curtailment of civil liberties, we ultimately need to know how these decisions were made and why. Only through this transparency can we understand for ourselves if government is acting in our best interest.

Advocates Decry Raimondo Order to Suspend RI Open Meeting Law Amid COVID-19 | WPRI 3.17.20

The provision did not sit well with New England First Amendment Coalition executive director Justin Silverman, who said it’s reasonable to allow public officials more flexibility during the coronavirus pandemic, “but there still must be citizen participation and oversight.” “This order makes it too easy for officials to evade transparency,” Silverman said. “As the governor said herself in the order, there are low-cost options available that allow public participation for meetings held remotely. Municipalities should be required to use them.” … Silverman, who advocates for open and transparent government across New England, raised additional concerns with the APRA changes, saying that any exception to the open meeting and public records laws must be offset by efforts elsewhere to maintain trust between citizens and their government. “In times of crisis, trust in our government is paramount,” Silverman said. “That trust won’t survive if we continue to chip away at our transparency laws without also mandating new safeguards for the public’s right to know.”

From Crashes to Arrests, Information in Worcester Harder to Come By | Telegram & Gazette 3.14.20

“You’re making the whole system more efficient and relieving some of the burden of public record requests from your own system,” said Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition. Silverman, whose organization defends and promotes public access to government, said he would expect Worcester, at a minimum, to be posting its arrest records online. “Worcester is a major city that we should expect these things from,” he said. “In fact, we should expect police logs to be posted online for every municipality.

Sunshine Week Forum: Your Right To Public Records, Open Meetings is Evolving | InDepthNH 3.11.20

Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, also met with members of the audience before and after the forum. NEFAC is a non-partisan non-profit organization that protects the five freedoms of the First Amendment and the public’s right to know about government. The coalition provides presentations in community centers, on campuses and in classrooms; hosts public workshops and clinics on freedom of information laws; trains journalists on the latest investigative techniques; and appears in court to defend the First Amendment rights of New Englanders.

‘Selective Reporting’ Bill Pulled After First Amendment Advocates Speak Out | NBC 10 3.5.20

The New England First Amendment Coalition vehemently opposed the legislation and issued the following statement: This bill is unwise and unconstitutional. The First Amendment prevents the government from taking over the editorial function of a newsroom and dictating how public issues are covered. As the U.S. Supreme Court explained in very clear terms, a responsible press is a desirable goal but press responsibility, like many other virtues, cannot be legislated. And for good reason. This type of legislation would turn newsrooms into an arm of the judicial system and ultimately discourage crime reporting altogether for fear of liability.

RI Lawmakers Put Forward Bill to Punish News Outlets Over Reporting | WPRI 3.5.20

Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, called the bill “unwise and unconstitutional.” “The First Amendment prevents government from taking over the editorial function of a newsroom and dictating how public issues are covered,” he said in a statement. “As the U.S. Supreme Court explained in very clear terms, a responsible press is a desirable goal but press responsibility, like many other virtues, cannot be legislated. And for good reason.” “This type of legislation would turn newsrooms into an arm of the judicial system and ultimately discourage crime reporting altogether for fear of liability,” he said.

Transparency Forum to Highlight Government Efforts to Conceal Info | The Telegraph 2.22.20

Every year, we in the media honor Sunshine Week to celebrate access to public information in our democracy and what it means to you and your community. For this event, the New Hampshire Center for Public Interest Journalism, Nashua Community College and the New England First Amendment Coalition will co-sponsor “How Transparent is NH Government and Why It Matters” at the college in Room 150.

R.I. High Court Refuses to Disclose 38 Studios Grand-Jury Records | Providence Journal 2.18.20

The state affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union — which joined Common Cause Rhode Island, the New England First Amendment Coalition and the Rhode Island Press Association in arguing transparency should outweigh secrecy — also expressed disappointment.

Recess: When Students Write the Curricula on Transforming Education | The Berkshire Eagle 2.17.20

Now a high school graduate, Cook was on her way to joining some of her fellow plaintiffs and student advocates in receiving the New England First Amendment Coalition’s 2020 Antonia Orfield Citizenship Award. The honor is given “to New Englanders who have fought for information crucial to the public’s understanding of its community or what its government is doing — or not doing — on its behalf.”

Some Practical Arguments for the Free Press | Providence Journal 2.15.20

Today, now known as A.G. Sulzberger, that young reporter is the 39-year-old publisher of his family’s newspaper, The New York Times. And there was a packed room of journalists in Boston on Feb. 7 when he received the Stephen Hamblett First Amendment Award — named after The Journal’s late publisher — from the New England First Amendment Coalition.

Concerns Raised About Proposed Limits on Vital Documents | Telegram & Gazette 2.15.20

Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, a nonprofit organization that defends and promotes public access to government, was also scratching his head as to why this proposal surfaced. “It seems like a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist,” he said. Silverman said the Baker administration’s argument that the measure is needed to bring Massachusetts in line with other states’ practices didn’t hold up. “There should be some reason — some evidence,” he said. Baker’s proposal “shows unwarranted concern for individual records and a complete dismissal for public interest that exists,” said Silverman. For journalists and others keeping an eye on government, he said, being able to see those documents is important to get a better understanding of what’s going on in our communities, and why.

Rhode Island Students Take Fight for Civic Education to Courts | The Brown Daily Herald 2.10.20

A group of Rhode Island students won an award for using their civic understanding to fight for civics education. The student activists, who are fighting for civic education in public schools, received the New England First Amendment Coalition’s 2020 Antonia Orfield Citizenship Award at NEFAC’s 10th annual awards luncheon in Boston Friday.

How to Save Journalism | The Boston Globe 2.11.20

The press should stop talking about the First Amendment as an abstraction. Instead, it should make powerful, practical arguments rooted in the lives of people and communities. New York Times publisher A. G. Sulzberger received the New England First Amendment Coalition’s 2020 Stephen Hamblett First Amendment Award on Feb. 7. The following is an excerpt of the remarks he delivered.

Rhode Island Students Take Fight for Civic Education to Courts | The Brown Daily Herald 2.10.20

A group of Rhode Island students won an award for using their civic understanding to fight for civics education. The student activists, who are fighting for civic education in public schools, received the New England First Amendment Coalition’s 2020 Antonia Orfield Citizenship Award at NEFAC’s 10th annual awards luncheon in Boston Friday.

A. G. Sulzberger Receives NEFAC’s 2020 Hamblett Award | The New York Times 2.7.20

A. G. Sulzberger received the New England First Amendment Coalition’s 2020 Stephen Hamblett First Amendment Award. You can read his remarks from Friday’s event here.

Hearst CT Given FOI Award for Boys, Girls Club Probe | New Haven Register 2.7.20

The New England First Amendment Coalition Friday honored Hearst Connecticut Media with its 2020 Michael Donoghue Freedom of Information Award for stories on sexual abuse cases tied to Boys & Girls Clubs across the country. The FOI Award is presented annually to New England journalists who protect or advance the public’s right to know under federal or state law.

First Amendment Group Recognizes R.I. Student Activists | The Providence Journal 2.7.20

Rhode Island student activists Aleita Cook, Nancy Xiong, Melly Sok, Symone Burrell, and Brian Aun accepted the New England First Amendment Coalition’s Antonia Orfield Citizenship Award on Friday during an awards ceremony in Boston. At the same event, New York Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger received the Stephen Hamblett First Amendment Award.

Public Records Should Stay Open | The Eagle-Tribune 2.5.20

“Sealing off these records for such a long period of time doesn’t seem to be in the public’s interest,” said Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition. “Access to these records is important, and the state shouldn’t be restricting it.”

Proposal Raises Freedom of Information Questions (video) | WCVB 1.31.20

First Amendment advocates and those pushing for more government transparency, however, argue that these records have several legitimate public uses that would be curtailed if these limits are imposed. For example, researchers can use the information to study health trends or trace family history. Additionally, they say that investigators and reporters may use the information to confirm identities or report information that is in the public interest. The New England First Amendment Coalition said it hopes lawmakers reject the proposal.

Baker Wants Birth, Death Records Secret in Most Cases | The Boston Globe 1.30.20

Baker’s proposal doesn’t seek to specifically change public records statute, but “we’re dealing with withholding individual certificates and records, which relative to that ruling, strikes me as even more concerning,” said Justin Silverman, the executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition. “There certainly are privacy considerations, but I would rather see those considerations made on a case-by-case basis rather than have a law that wholesale exempts all of these records from disclosure,” he said. Plus, he added, “Why do it now?”

Baker Seeks to Close Off Vital Records | The Eagle-Tribune 1.30.20

Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, called the governor’s proposal “excessive.” “Sealing off these records for such a long period of time doesn’t seem to be in the public’s interest,” he said. “Access to these records is important, and the state shouldn’t be restricting it.”

Northfield Denies Public Records Request | Times Argus 1.30.20

Justin Silverman is an attorney based out of Massachusetts and the executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition. Silverman said the public needs to know why and how a police officer is involved in a crash. He said there may be some parts of the investigation that are exempt from being public, but not all of it. “You have a police officer who was found to be at fault for the crash. All the more reason that we should have details about the investigation to make sure that police officer was held accountable as any other citizen would be if they were involved in a similar crash,” he said.

Hearst CT Wins New England FOI Award | New Haven Register 1.22.20

The New England First Amendment Coalition will honor Hearst Connecticut Media with its 2020 Michael Donoghue Freedom of Information Award for its project on sexual abuse cases tied to Boys & Girls Clubs across the country, the organization announced Wednesday.The FOI Award is presented annually to New England journalists who protect or advance the public’s right to know under federal or state law. A committee of First Amendment Coalition board members chooses the FOI Award recipient based solely on merit, the organization said in a release.

Move to Handcuff News Outlets is Unconstitutional | The Eagle Tribune 1.18.20

Wesley was ruling in a Connecticut case involving news organizations that did not delete items about a woman’s arrest once the charge was dropped. News organizations had no obligation to do so, he found, noting that the information was accurate at the time it appeared. His decision was quoted by the New England First Amendment Coalition in a letter to lawmakers arguing against Flanagan’s bill.

DA’s Office Whistleblower Resigns Over Public Records Issues | The Berkshire Eagle 1.17.20

Justin Silverman, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, said it would be “simply inexcusable” for public officials to attempt to abuse the public records law and its exemptions. “Falsely claiming an investigation is ongoing as a way to keep records secret violates the law and our trust in public officials,” he said. “When officials abuse the investigatory exemption of the public records law, they prevent us from learning if justice is being served in our communities. They also weaken the credibility of those who will use the exemption to protect actual investigations in the future.”

SJC Ruling Benefits Press, Readers | The Berkshire Eagle 1.3.20

Warning of the dangers that would follow should the lawsuit be upheld, the New England First Amendment Coalition, joined by the Massachusetts Newspaper Publishers Association and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, among others, stated in an amicus brief that “Massachusetts journalists will no longer be able to report information contained in police blotters, a reliable and frequent source for news coverage about something that is of the utmost public importance — crime. This will necessarily have a chilling effect on the press’s ability to report official government information, to the detriment of an informed public.”